Parking rules

Overview

Parking rules exist to improve traffic flow and provide safe, efficient and equitable access for all motorists. Find out more about the rules governing parking in the City of Hobart below.

Parking restrictions

Parking restrictions differ across the whole municipality, including the central city. Please remember to always check the parking signs no matter what time of the day or night. Some signs apply all the time, while others may apply only during certain times.

Clearways

Clearways improve traffic flow at the busiest times of the day. You cannot stop your car between clearway signs during the times specified on the sign.

Children's crossings

Stopping your vehicle on or too close to a children's crossing may mean that a child entering the crossing can’t see or be seen by an approaching car.

When a children's crossing is in operation (i.e. when the flags are displayed) you must not stop:

  • on a children's crossing
  • within 20 m before the crossing
  • within 10 m after the crossing.

This means that even stopping to let a child out or pick a child up is an offence.

These restrictions do not apply when flags are not displayed and the crossing is unattended.

However, if there is also a 'No Stopping' sign at the approach to the crossing, you must obey it at all times.

Intersections

Parking your vehicle too close to an intersection can endanger pedestrians and other drivers by blocking their view of the traffic, and by restricting other drivers’ turning space.

A driver must not stop in an intersection or on a road within 20 m of an intersection with traffic lights.

A driver must not stop in an intersection or on a road within 10 m of an intersection without traffic lights.

This rule does not apply if you are parked in a marked parking bay controlled by a parking meter.

Yellow lines

A yellow line at the edge of the pavement or adjacent to the gutter indicates that you are not permitted to stop your vehicle for any amount of time, even if you do not leave the vehicle.

Parking correctly on a road

When parking on a two-way road you must park the vehicle facing the direction of travel and parallel to the left-hand side. You must get the left wheels of the car as close to the kerb as you can and, if there are no marked parking bays, leave at least one metre between you and the cars in front and behind.

When parking on a one-way road you must park the vehicle facing the direction of travel, parallel and as near as possible to the far left or far right side of the road unless otherwise indicated by information on or with a parking control sign.

You must also park a vehicle at least three metres from a continuous dividing line (single or double) or dividing strip unless otherwise indicated by information on or with a parking control sign.

You must also leave three metres of road alongside the vehicle that is clear for other vehicles to pass unless otherwise indicated by information on or with a parking control sign.

If there are marked parking bays on the road you must only park within the marked lines, and you must not park partly in and partly out of parking areas.

Stopping across driveways

You must not stop on or across your own or another person’s driveway, or so close to the driveway that you obstruct a vehicle from driving in or out.

Stopping on a footpath, bicycle path, nature strip or painted island

You are not allowed to stop any part of your vehicle on a footpath, bicycle path, nature strip or painted island. Parking even two wheels on a footpath can cause a hazard for pedestrians who are forced to walk on the roadway.

Median strips (dividing strips)

Median strips are areas that run down the centre of a road to divide the two lanes of traffic. You are not allowed to park on median strips unless a sign expressly permits it.

Parking meters

If a permissive parking sign states ‘meter’ then you must pay for the time you remain parked in the bay at the parking meter allocated for that zone. The meter may be in front or behind your vehicle. The number on the footpath and the arrow will indicate the bay number and direction of the appropriate parking meter.

You may not stay on a parking meter for longer than the maximum time allowed, as indicated by the permissive parking sign.

View more information on parking meters.

 

Voucher parking

If a parking sign says ‘voucher’ then you must pay for the time you remain parked in the bay at the parking voucher machine allocated for that zone. The voucher machine may be in front or behind your vehicle or even across the road.

The voucher must then be clearly displayed on the dashboard of your vehicle.

You may not stay in a parking voucher area for longer than the maximum time allowed, as indicated by the permissive parking sign.

Parking vouchers are not permits and do not entitle you to park in a permit zone.

View more information on voucher parking.

Permit zones

Permit zones are restricted for permit holders only. These are usually reserved spaces for long-term parking.

Transport Access Scheme members, residential parking permits and vouchers do not authorise persons to park in permit zones.

Residential parking zones

If parking signs say Authorised Residents Vehicles Excepted the area is free for use by any member of the public for the time limit but an eligible resident with a permit can park in the zone for as long as they wish.

There are a number of residential parking areas that are clearways during specific peak times. Infringements will not be withdrawn if a residential permit holder remains parked in a clearway.

View more information on residential parking.