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Marieville Esplanade Coastal Adaptation Project

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Marieville Esplanade Coastal Conversation

The City of Hobart’s Marieville Esplanade Coastal Adaptation Project (MECAP) invites the community to ‘drop-in’ for a coastal conversation to share their knowledge, values and experiences of Marieville Esplanade and to learn more about the local coastal climate hazards, what is and isn’t at risk and the range of responses that can be used to manage coastal impacts on:

Dates:                  Thursday 6th and Friday 7th April 2017

Time:                    2.00 pm – 7.00 pm

Venue:                  Derwent Sailing Squadron, Marieville Esplanade

Tasmanian Government coastal hazard mapping, identifies Marieville Esplanade area as vulnerable to the impacts of coastal hazards of storm-tide inundation and coastal erosion.  To begin to respond to these hazards the City is delivering the Marieville Esplanade Coastal Adaptation Pathways (MECAP).  This is an ‘informal’ consultation, comprised of a series of maps and images of the area’s values and features intended to enable ‘local’ conversations with our consultants Climate Planning. The outcomes from the conversations will be reported back to the Hobart City Council, considered in any works that may be required and inform the preparation of a Coastal Hazards Strategy for Hobart’s coastline. It does not identify or suggest a preferred coastal adaptation pathway or response. 

Marieville Esplanade and coastal hazards

The Marieville Esplanade area is identified as being vulnerable to the sea level rise impacts of coastal inundation and erosion resulting from climate change (see Figure 1). The Tasmanian Government coastal hazard mapping indicates that while the area is currently exposed to these risks, they will increase over time, with inundation being a more significant long-term risk than coastal erosion.

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FIGURE 1 COASTAL HAZARD MAPPING SHOWING AREAS VULNERABLE TO COASTAL INUNDATION AND EROSION BY 2100. LEGEND:

  • GREEN: LOW HAZARD (AREAS VULNERABLE TO A 1% AEP STORM TIDE EVENT IN 2100; THESE AREAS HAVE A MEDIUM TERM FLOODING ISSUE 
  • ORANGE: MEDIUM HAZARD (AREAS VULNERABLE TO A 1% AEP STORM TIDE EVENT IN 2050; THE MEDIUM BAND ALSO CONTAINS ALL OF THE LAND THAT WILL BE IMPACTED BY A 0.8M SEA LEVEL RISE BY 2100)
  • RED: HIGH HAZARD (AREAS THAT WILL BE WITHIN THE 0.2M SEA LEVEL RISE FROM THE MEAN HIGH TIDE LINE BY 2050; THESE AREAS ARE CURRENTLY IMPACTED BY THE HIGHEST ASTRONOMICAL TIDE

To better respond to these hazards, the City of Hobart has engaged consultants, Climate Planning, to help it undertake a community conversation that will:

  • inform the community and City of Hobart of the identified coastal hazards within the Marieville Esplanade area.
  • identify and invite the sharing of local coastal values, stories, anecdotes and experiences associated with the project area.
  • provide an overview of adaptation options that are typically used to respond to coastal hazards in the medium to long term.

The outputs of this community conversation will be reported to the Hobart City Council and used to inform further coastal adaptation planning and considerations for the project area. It is recognised at the outset of this project that further investigation and technical studies, along with detailed community consultation, will be required before any adaptation action is considered or implemented.

To assist in better understanding the coastal hazards and to undertake the conversation, the City of Hobart in collaboration with Climate Planning has prepared a background paper that quantifies the ‘material’ risks to private and public assets and services and developed visual tools to communicate these.

Marieville Esplanade Coastal Adaptation Pathways, Background paper March 2017

Extracts from an unpublished report by McConnell and Evans Hobart on Hobart’s Coastal Heritage on Marieville Esplanade and Wrest Point also informed the background paper and are provided as interest to the conversation.

McConnell and Evans Historical Extracts- Marieville Esplanade and Wrest Point

Marieville Esplanade Coastal Adaptation Project Overview

The Marieville project area (see Figure 2) extends from Sandy Bay Rivulet in the north through to Lords Beach in the south and extends to the extent of the hazard area. The area is highly modified and includes private residences, open-space public recreational areas of the Errol Flynn Reserve and playgrounds along with the private assets of the Royal Yacht Club of Tasmania, the Derwent Sailing Squadron and Wrest Point Tasmania. It attracts tourists and users from the local and wider community for a range of passive and active sport and recreational activities.

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 Figure 2: The image depicts the Marieville Esplanade project area.  

The total project area is 40.8 hectares and contains a variety of assets such as land, buildings, infrastructure and social amenities which have a current estimated value of nearly $350 million. However, it is important to note that while there is some current exposure to the coastal hazard of inundation during extreme events that by the year 2100 the risk will be high.

The area has historically been subject to erosion and inundation. Reclamation works have been undertaken at various stages since the 1800s to mitigate these impacts and to provide open space recreational opportunities. These works have mitigated the area’s current exposure to erosion; however, it is still identified as vulnerable to inundation.

About the Marieville Esplanade Coastal Adaptation Project

MECAP builds on the City’s adaptation pathway planning project at Nutgrove Beach, Long Beach and Blinking Billy Point, which is also identified as vulnerable to coastal hazards.  The Nutgrove project was undertaken with the Tasmanian Government and SGS Economic and Planning under the Tasmanian Coastal Adaptation Pathways program.

MECAP combines the principles and pathway options used for the Tasmanian Climate Coastal Adaptation Pathways, an initiative of the Tasmanian Climate Change Office and SGS Economics and Planning, along with the approach developed by Climate Planning in the Kingston Beach Integrated Climate Change and Natural Hazards Project. Key to both the projects are the principles that:

  • quantifying the exposure to hazards supports the development of informed decision making
  • sharing information is an important element in the risk management process
  • developing risk will be actively managed
  • people cannot be subsidised to occupy or use hazardous locations.

While the MECAP project does not prescribe or seek to identify an adaptation pathway the TCAP pathways are borrowed to inform the project as they represent the three possible pathways or combinations thereof that are typically used in adaptation planning:

  1. Let climate change take its course and retreat early. This pathway allows maximum freedom for natural coastal processes to unfold, with a minimum of intervention or resistance from future development or coastal protection works. Where erosion threatens structures, they would be removed. Where property is regularly inundated, it would eventually not be worth repairing and redevelopment in affected areas would not be permitted.
  1. Protect existing development as long as practical while protecting natural values. This pathway protects property but only where that protection has a minimal impact on the values of the area important to the community. There is balance between protecting natural and shared community assets, and private property. There is also consideration of promoting and sustaining natural ecosystems in the face of climate change. In general, intensification of development in hazard areas would be discouraged unless it and the protection measures required clearly did not have any negative impact on natural and community values or were likely to have a positive effect.
  1. Protect existing development and permit new development to the maximum possible extent for as long as possible. This pathway concentrates on protecting the existing and future community and property using any available options. Intensification of development provides more contributors to any protection works, so some intensification is permitted where it does not compromise community values for the suburb. While natural areas may be affected, they may adapt in their own way or become modified in ways that the community accepts.

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Hobart Tasmania 7001